Tuesday, November 20, 2007

Dance. Dance. Dance.



I love folk dancing when I was young. Since Grade 1 to 4th year high school in Bacolod, I have been competing in local and regional folk dancing competitions. Among the Filipino dances that I performed were the country's national dance the Tinikling from Leyte, the Hispanic castanet-beating La Jota Moncadena from Tarlac, the stick beating war dance Sakuting from Abra and the local sugarcane planter's Sacada dance from Negros Occidental. I even know how to interpret the dances written by National Artist for Dance Francisca Reyes Aquino. It has been my passion to dance local dances because I have awkward feet in pop and hiphop dances when I was young. However, the past years when i was in college, I decided to concentrate in my academics and lessen my extra-curricular activities. So I left my tights and dancing shoes in Bacolod so that I could just be the nerdy kid in the university.

It was only early this month that I was invited to dance one of the local dances of the Cordillera region by a few locals. Thank God I will not wear the skimpybahag or the g-string that the native Ibalois used to wear during the ceremonial Bendiyan Canao dance. This dance is usually performed by Ibaloi communities in Kabayan town in Benguet province to ensure bountiful harvest and pay homage to their god Kabunian.

Some people would call this dance as a form of dance-drama where some dancers would act out roles and shout chants in Ibaloi language. Here are some pix of Mojo Potato during his attempt to dance with the elders of the town and chronicle the remaining dances left in this part of the country.


Pinasbikan is the first Bendiyan dance step which means to take cover and ready for attack against the enemies whom they call as the Bosol or headhunters from other tribes.


Salawasao is the second Bendiyan dance pasition which means that the Ibalois announce to the world that they are conquerors of lands and brave warriors.

The other Bendiyan dance steps in order are the Kinitangan (winning the battle), Kinikian (Captured enemy and slaves), Inushongan (Protecting the village), Pindadjusan (Fortune).


This is the Inabaya, the eighth and last Bendiyan dance step which mean's carrying the spoils of battle. This step means to celebrate the victory of the Ibaloi people in battle.



Thankfully, I won't be wearing something like this and dancing around in my almost-butt-naked-glory

0 COMMENTS:

CORDI SPONSORS

Your Ad Here Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.This policy is valid from 17 May 2007 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.This policy is valid from 17 May 2007